CDC Allows Novavax Monovalent COVID-19 Boosters for Adults Ages 18 and Older | CDC Online Newsroom – CDC

For Immediate Release: Wednesday, October 19, 2022
Contact: Media Relations
(404) 639-3286
Today, CDC’s Director Rochelle P. Walensky, M.D., M.P.H., signed a decision memo allowing Novavax monovalent COVID-19 boosters for adults.
This action gives people ages 18 years and older the option to receive a Novavax monovalent booster instead of an updated (bivalent) Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna booster if they have completed primary series vaccination but have not previously received a COVID-19 booster—and if they cannot or will not receive mRNA vaccines.
Some may be unable to receive an mRNA vaccine as a result of an allergy to a component of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, or as a result of a history of a severe allergic reaction (such as anaphylaxis) after a previous dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, or a lack of availability of an mRNA vaccine. People ages 18 and older may also choose to receive a Novavax monovalent booster if they are unwilling to receive mRNA vaccines, and would otherwise not receive a booster dose.
FDA’s authorization of monovalent COVID-19 boosters and CDC’s recommendation for use, are important steps forward in our country’s comprehensive vaccination program—a program that has helped provide increased protection for all Americans against COVID-19 disease and death.
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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
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